CONTEMPORARY ONE WORD SEVERAL WORLDS

mercredi 21 août 2019

New York: Christie’s is all set to celebrate 25 years of art curation


Source Architectural Digest by Uma Nair
Market studies clearly show that for two decades Christie’s has commanded 70% of the market share for South Asian Modern + Contemporary Art in 2018. Eight of the top ten auction prices in the category have been achieved at Christie’s. Results in sale reflect that between 1994 and 2005, Christie’s sold approximately $20 million of South Asian Modern + Contemporary Art, while between 2005 and 2018 sales in the category surpassed $400 million. Selling rates in New York achieved over 90% by lot in March 2019, and a year earlier the New York sale established the highest price for the category when Tapovan by abstract master Syed Haider Raza sold for $4.45 million.
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mercredi 14 août 2019

Antilia, la folie de Mukesh Ambani


Source Les Echos par Tristan Gaston-Breton
Les six premiers étages peuvent abriter 200 voitures, dont les 168 véhicules de collection appartenant au maître des lieux. Un atelier de réparation - avec ses mécaniciens - et une station-service ont même été prévus. Quatre autres étages sont entièrement occupés par des jardins suspendus et un encore par un hôpital privé équipé du matériel le plus récent. Le bâtiment abrite également quatre piscines - dont une olympique -, un spa et un centre de « fitness » dernière génération, une salle à manger copiée sur celle d'un grand hôtel new-yorkais, une salle de réception et de bal, une dizaine de salons, un théâtre de 50 places, une salle de cinéma avec écran géant, un temple privé, et trois héliports aménagés sur le toit !
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mardi 13 août 2019

See Inside India’s Opulent New Sculpture Park in a 19th-Century Palace


Source Artsy by Alina Cohen
About four miles from the center of Jaipur, in northwest India, Nahargarh Fort rises from the scrub-studded hills. Madhavendra Palace peers out from inside the stone fortress walls, its 19th century architecture rhyming with the ornate, pastel architecture for which the city is famous—30 minutes away, the Hawa Mahal, an apricot-hued, layer cake of a building attracts tourists and photographers year round. In December 2017, Madhavendra Palace itself became a major destination when it opened as India’s first contemporary sculpture park.
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samedi 10 août 2019

From Gandhi to the UN: Indian artist weaves story of destruction and rebirth in Hong Kong show


Source South China Morning Post by Enid Tsui
They will see themselves becoming one of the crowd. There are a number of large paintings filled with many small figures and animals. Indian art history, especially Mughal miniatures, seep into his work just as his parents, friends and former teachers do, he says. He often paints the figures and animals in a grid-like, orderly arrangement but something always disrupts the surface tranquillity. This is true of Come Give Us A Speech (2008) – a series of panels that show all kinds of people and a few deities sitting in plastic chairs – where plumes of black smoke cover parts of the painting. That work is accompanied by Gathering is Evil (2007), in which the only figure is a large, black skeleton against a background of empty, ghostly chairs.
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mardi 6 août 2019

Art Exhibition: Canopy for Conservation


Source Outlook India by Nayanika Mukherjee
The deity Baradeo sits on a lotus leaf, when the idea of Creation dawns on him. He looks around, but water spreads till the edge of the horizon. He rubs his chest with pensive intent, and fashions a crow from the grime. It flies far in search of clay to further Creation, until tiredly landing atop a stump. But this is no tree—it is the claw of a mystical crab, who reveals where all the clay has gone. A giant earthworm in the nether world collects and feasts on it. The crab pulls him out of this damp abode, and forces the worm to spit out the clay. The crow quickly grabs it, and flies home. With a spiderweb woven atop the watery expanse, Baradeo fashions the Earth’s creatures from this clay. If Indian creation myths are your cup of tea, Gond legends are a quirky starting point for the inquisitive. As one of our largest and oldest tribes, their folklore is intricate and imaginative.
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mercredi 24 juillet 2019

Mumbai: Chemould Prescott Road brings to life the second edition of Modus Operandi


Source Architectural Digest by Arya Chatterjee
The show embarks on creating a journey for inexperienced collectors, young or old, to buy great works of contemporary art at affordable prices. According to Gandhy, who has an eye for Indian contemporary art, some of the works featured in this exhibition were discovered after rummaging through artists’ stock rooms. A few were especially created for the show. “An artist’s studio is a sacred space not accessible to all, a place where they pursue all their inspirations. I have had the privilege of exploring these spaces and have always come out enriched and inspired by the work that I have seen,” she says. To evoke the same sense of excitement and awe for the viewer, Gandhy hopes to bridge this gap, bringing to light the process of evolution that each artist goes through in creating a work of art. Bringing something from the studios of all the featured artists—mood boards, drawing books, worktables, chairs, photographs to sculptures—Gandhy turns the gallery into a montage of various studios. The show is truly a mixture of the creative chaos that is an artist’s mind.
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lundi 22 juillet 2019

With Jean Pigozzi's contemporary African art donation, MoMA to become a 'leader' in the field


Source The Art Newspaper by Nancy Kenney
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) announced today that the collector and photographer Jean Pigozzi was donating a “transformative” gift of 45 works of contemporary African art to the museum, positioning MoMA to become a “unique institutional leader” in the field. Glenn D. Lowry, the museum’s director, said in a statement that the gift would play an important role in the ambitious re-installation of MoMA’s permanent collection, which is taking shape as the institution prepares to reopen on 21 October in expanded galleries. The museum has cast the rehanging as an opportunity to rethink the entire history of Modern and contemporary art, highlighting and juxtaposing artists of more diverse backgrounds and geographic origins.
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samedi 20 juillet 2019

It is extremely urgent that the Indian art community reaches out to local audiences: Shanay Jhaveri


Source The Hindustan Times by Srishti Jha
In April 2016, I joined The Metropolitan Museum of Art as its first incumbent curator for Modern and Contemporary art from South Asia and immediately proposed Mukherjee’s show. The Museum’s Modern and Contemporary department under the leadership of Sheena Wagstaff has been committed to reconsidering a received art history. This has manifested in our exhibition programme as well as our collecting approach. The Met Breuer was inaugurated with a solo show of Nasreen Mohamedi and since then Modern and Contemporary Art from South Asia has been consistently represented at the Museum. Mohamedi set the pace and spirit for the programme. I felt that Mukherjee would be the right artist to follow Mohamedi, with a solo retrospective at The Met Breuer; they are two artists occupying the furthest ends of the artistic spectrum in their visual idiom, particularly in relation to the breadth of the modernity projects cultivated and nurtured in and through Baroda.
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vendredi 19 juillet 2019

Non-stop Rain Room at Sharjah Art Foundation


Source Indian Blooms
The Rain Room is an unusual and evocative experience for visitors who will enjoy the sound and nearby feel of being in the rain without getting wet. When visitors enter the room, they are directed to navigate intuitively and carefully through the dark underground space in order to protect themselves from the downpour. As the visitors walk through the room, which uses 1,200 liters of self-cleaning, recycled water, their movements trigger motion sensors that pauses the rainfall when detecting movement. Founded in 2005, Random International is a London-based collaborative studio for experimental and digital practice within contemporary art. Their work, which includes sculpture, performance and large-scale architectural installations, reflects the relationship between man and machine and centres on audience interaction.
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dimanche 14 juillet 2019

On Ravinder Reddy’s first one-man exhibition in Kolkata


Source The Hindu by Soumitra Das
The gopurams or pyramidal towers of South Indian temples bristle with thousands of figures of deities. Rural deities or grama devatas, occasionally stark naked, are the guardians of villages in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. G. Ravinder Reddy strips these figures of their divinity and turns them into icons of working women of our times, transformed in his imagination into empowered goddesses who can hold their own, irrespective of class and social status.
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samedi 13 juillet 2019

Delhi art lovers do not miss out on this exhibition at Kiran Nadar Museum of Art


Source The New Indian Express
If you haven’t caught the big fat retrospective exhibition of one of India’s leading woman contemporary artists, Arpita Singh at Kiran Nadar Museum of Art (DLF South Court Mall, Saket), you have till July 14. About 180 works by the 82-year-old Delhi-based artist have been curated by Roobina Karode in the show titled Submergence: In the Midst of Here and There. Singh who hails from Baranagar in Kolkata, graduated with a Diploma in Fine Arts from Delhi Polytechnic in 1959. In 1972, she had her first solo exhibition at Kunika Chemould Gallery, New Delhi.
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vendredi 12 juillet 2019

A Tribal Tradition Under Threat


Source Raw Vision by Deidi von Schaewen
The Adivasi tradition of house painting is centuries old; some say, it is rooted in prehistoric rock art. Passed from generation to generation, mothers and aunts to daughters and nieces, the practice occurs across the region’s different tribes, such as the Oraons, Santals, Mundas, Ganjs and Kurmis. There are a dozen or so different styles of house painting, but within those styles the murals are personal to the tribe and to the artist, variations even occurring from house to house. The Adivasi consider their homes to be sacred, and daubing their walls with art is an expression of faith, identity, culture, pride, family, love, thanks and more.
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mardi 9 juillet 2019

Indian Art and Culture: The book ‘A Conjuror’s Archive’ pays an ode to artist Jangarh Singh Shyam


Source Architectural Digest by Avantika Shankar
Jangarh would recreate the world of the stories he grew up with—a world so distant from the modernist art school he was studying in—and in that sense, created a contemporaneity of his own. “Modernism cannot be confined to certain movements in modernism,” muses Dr. Jain, “He has also done a couple of autobiographical works—tribal artists don’t do that. Where would you place this interaction? It is a kind of modernity. His marginalisation, his coming away from the tradition to which he belonged, his recreating that entire world of imagination…to surpass all other art school-trained artists who were around him…” Dr. Jain explains. “There are modern artists who continue to do what they’re doing, in some way or the other, and that isn’t innovation.” Jangarh Singh, on the other hand, was perpetually throwing himself into new forms—from using poster colours for the first time at age 18 to using architectural forms as his canvas—and the continued relevance of his work is a testament to his revolutionary mind. “If modernity comes from being open to new things, imbibing them in your work…” Dr. Jain says, “I think he was able to do that all the time.”
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dimanche 7 juillet 2019

Prabhakar Barwe, the Jacques Derrida of Indian modernism


Source National Herald by Vibha Galhotra
In the scorching heat of Delhi, while all seemed grumpy and dull, walking into the National Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA) changed the pace of my day. The cool breeze of the gallery along with the experience of space, colour, form and poetry, as I entered the retrospective exhibition ‘Astitva: The Essence of Prabhakar Barwe,’ brought back a different sense of fulfillment. A forgotten hero of modernist, pre-contemporary art movement in India, Prabhakar Barwe (1936 – 1995), was much ahead of his time and was widely appreciated by his peers and seniors for his unique sense of depiction and his concern with the language of painting rather than visual images and signs. Given his attention to detail, it goes without saying that Barwe was quite analytical of his work and constantly seeking deep meaning through experimentation with colour and form. His style and process somehow reminds me of the concept of deconstruction introduced by philosopher Jacques Derrida who explored the interplay between language and the construction of meaning in search of learning about the intended meaning or structural unity of a particular text. Similarly, Barwe was trying find newer realities created by abstracting an image from its real form. In one of his notes Barwe mentions, “The interplay between concrete and abstract is my prime preoccupation. It gives me immense pleasure to work on that meeting point to that thin line of demarcation, where abstraction meets the concrete or separates from it.”
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mercredi 19 juin 2019

At the Met Breuer, Awe-Inspiring Sculptures of Deities Show How an Indian Artist Forged Her Own Personal Language for Fabric Art


Source Artnet News by Ben Davis
My sense is that the public might be in danger of missing the Mrinalini Mukherjee show, “Phenomenal Nature,” which opened recently at the Met Breuer, because her name is not well known, and because it lacks an easy hook. Mukherjee hailed from a different art world, India in the 1970s to the 2000s, and her work draws on a pool of references and traditions that might be slightly unfamiliar. But at the same time, her sculptures eschewed the kinds of easily marketed images of “Indian-ness” that the global contemporary art biz sometimes feeds on. It has its own rhythms, and you can’t approach it either purely formally or purely iconographically, but have to find some other way in.
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mardi 11 juin 2019

Bhupen Khakhar's painting on homosexuality breaks auction record


Source Business Standard
"Two Men in Benares", a 1980s painting by Indian contemporary artist Bhupen Khakhar has set a new auction record for the painter by selling at a whopping $3.2 million here. The sale took place at the Sotheby's auction house on Monday. Going under the hammer was the "Coups de Coeur: The Guy and Helen Barbier Family Collection", an offering of 29 artworks from one of the finest collections of 20th century Indian art in private hands. When Khakhar (1934-2003) first unveiled "Two Men in Benares" in Mumbai in 1986, he became the first Indian artist to freely disclose his sexual orientation through his work.
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lundi 10 juin 2019

Jogen Chowdhury’s new gallery is a much-needed pick-me-up for Kolkata’s art world


Source The Hindu by Soumitra Das
This lacuna has been somewhat filled, though in a small way, with Jogen Chowdhury’s five-storey building devoted entirely to the visual arts. The first of its kind in Bengal, the museum is on a street opposite the busy South City Mall on Prince Anwar Shah Road. Charubasona, the Jogen Chowdhury Centre for Arts, was inaugurated in April in the presence of the eminences grises of Kolkata’s cultural world, including poet Sankha Ghosh, artists Rabin Mandal, Ganesh Haloi and Partha Pratim Deb, actor Soumitra Chatterjee, litterateur Sirshendu Mukherjee, and art critic and historian Pranabranjan Ray.
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vendredi 7 juin 2019

Inside sculptor Mrinalini Mukherjee’s highly-anticipated exhibit


Source Vogue India by Shanay Jhavery
I remember the first time I came across Mrinalini Mukherjee’s art—it was the early 2000s at a private collector’s home and a sculpture titled Adi Pushp II (1998-99). The bold evocation of sexuality, the exceptional handling of fibre, and the deft deployment of colour… it was a revelation. I was a PhD student when I met her for the first time in 2014. The following year we had planned to spend more time together in Delhi after her retrospective at the NGMA, but sadly she passed away a week after the opening. I never imagined then, that one day I would be curating her first international retrospective and also editing the most comprehensive monograph on her prodigious practice.
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mardi 4 juin 2019

Met, New York: Mrinalini Mukherjee’s sculptures will flourish at the museum this summer


Source Architectural Digest by Uma Nair
“The historic exhibition takes a deep look at Mukherjee’s crucial work, highlighting her anthropomorphic sculptures exploring spirits, deities, feminism and sexuality,” says Max Hollein, museum director. “Together these pieces will demonstrate the significance of Mukherjee’s oeuvre to the evolution of modern art in India and her role as a forerunner of contemporary figurative sculpture.” The exhibition’s curator is Shanay Jhaveri, Assistant Curator, South Asia, in The MET’s Department of Modern and Contemporary Art. “Mrinalini always enjoyed subverting conventions,” says Jhaveri. “She prefers to explore the hidden character of the material, its tactile potential, its ability to express a daring yet subtle eroticism, its power to contain within it an organic fecundity.”
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mercredi 29 mai 2019

Venice Biennale 2019: At the coveted fair, there’s more to India than just Gandhi


Source Architectural Digest by Ankush Arora
India’s return to the Venice Biennale, after a gap of 8 years, has caused much cheer among the country’s close-knit art fraternity, even as the country’s Pavilion theme —‘150 Years of Gandhi’—is the latest example of the national icon being marketed superfluously. While it is anybody’s guess as to what extent Gandhi actually influences the country’s 1.3-billion population, the 58th edition of world’s oldest international art exhibition resonates with themes more contemporary to India. From the self-explanatory curatorial theme (‘May you live in interesting times’) to debates around gender and sexuality, constrained freedom or systems of democracy, extreme weather events and perils of technology, the Venice Biennale’s diverse presentations speak to anyone trying to make sense of a rapidly churning world. From the nearly 100 national pavilions and numerous parallel exhibitions that are part of the biennale, here are AD’s select five picks.
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mardi 28 mai 2019

Why they love the cage


Source The Pioneer by U Nair
Shakuntala’s sculptures have an Indian insignia. “ I used the armour as a metaphor to explore how I could protect my body,” states Shakuntala. “I borrowed from all kinds of cultures; Naga masks, Rajasthani ghagras, hair styles from Bollywood in the 1960s — my pieces have no cultural, geographical or religious boundaries. I used cane because I am comfortable with it; also, it is linear, delicate and looks grand. There are rings, bangles, flared skirts and it is very feminine.” As you look through the cane — the ideation seems full of multiple perspectives.The cane is tenuous and tensile, flexible yet delicate in a strong sort of way. No doubt there are many references — history culture and the beauty of dances, Kathakali and Manipuri costumes and regalia become a translation — that are royal yet replete with rhythmic intonations.
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lundi 27 mai 2019

Nalini Malani Wins 70.000 € Joan Miró Prize


Source Art News
In a statement, the prize’s jury said, “By alluding to a myriad of cultural references from both East and West, [Malani] has built an impressive body of work that engages viewers through complex, immersive installations that present her vision of the battered world we live in. Her interest in ancient mythology, both Greek and Indian, as well as in modern symbols and image-making, has allowed her to develop a very personal, cosmopolitan iconographic mingling that boldly denounces contemporary violence and injustice, and their effects on planetary life.”
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dimanche 26 mai 2019

The extraordinary art of ordinary things


Source Hindustan Times by Shunali Khullar Shroff
Artist Shilpa Gupta’s studio on the second floor of a quaint Parsi bungalow in Bandra is extraordinarily spacious. Extraordinary is also a word one could apply to Gupta’s work, which she creates by using quotidian objects in unexpected ways. Gupta has had a successful joint exhibition in Dubai this year. Even today, having participated in biennales and triennales across the world, from Havana to Yokohama, Seoul to Sydney, Kochi to Venice, it is with a sense of disbelief that she receives the high praise for her art. This isn’t pretend modesty. Gupta is resolutely pessimistic when it comes to her work. Her installations have graced galleries such as Tate Modern, Centre Pompidou, MoMA, Serpentine, Guggenheim and closer home, the Kiran Nadar Museum of Art and Devi Art Foundation. And yet, exhibition after successful exhibition has been preceded by a foreboding that it will all end in disaster.
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mercredi 22 mai 2019

How India Inspired the Barbier Family’s Infatuation with Art


Source Sotheby's
Discover an exciting collection of works by some of the most important and avant-garde artists from South Asia in our upcoming sale Coups de Coeur: The Guy and Helen Barbier Family Collection (10 June | London). When Guy Barbier’s career took his family to India in the 1980s, it was the start of a love affair with the country and in particular its modern and contemporary art. From Bhupen Khakhar’s controversial Two Men in Benares, to inspirational works by Ram Kumar, Maqbool Fid Husain and Rameshwar Broota, the sale tells the story of the Barbier family’s friendships and their cultural journey through the Subcontinent. Click here to watch more Sotheby’s videos.
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mardi 14 mai 2019

David Adjaye chosen to design 'game-changing' contemporary art museum in India


Source The Art Newspaper by Tim Cornwell
The UK-Ghanaian architect David Adjaye has been chosen to design what is set to be the most significant contemporary art space in India. The jury the Kiran Nadar Museum of Art's design made the announcement yesterday in Venice at a dinner for the Indian pavilion at the waterside Palazzo Pisani Moretta. The planned museum is “an important milestone for Indian contemporary art", says Shwetal A. Patel, an art writer and researcher at the University of Southampton, adding that "the appointment of Adjaye Associates has added a measure of excitement and anticipation".
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