CONTEMPORARY ONE WORD SEVERAL WORLDS

samedi 14 mars 2020

One World Through Art: A Review of Modernisms at the Block Museum

Source Newcityart by Chris Miller
Sixty years ago, Abby Weed Grey began traveling to Iran, Turkey and northern India to collect art. A childless, recently widowed St. Paul housewife, she used her late husband’s small fortune to establish a foundation for “the encouragement of art through the assembling of international collections of art for cultural exchange programs.” Such a project may have been inspired by the tours of “New American Paintings” throughout Europe, sponsored by the CIA in the late 1950s. She focused on Middle Eastern artists who were “breaking with the past to cope with the present,” much like modern artists in Europe and America had been doing for half a century. It does not appear that she had any aesthetic or ideological requirements—except that, like the mainstream art world of her day and ours, she must have considered beauty, naturalism and idealism to be outdated relics from another era.
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lundi 9 mars 2020

Home of Warli Adivasi revolt, Talasari’s loyalty to the Left deepens


Source The Indian Express by Kavitha Iyer
There is no memorial at the banyan tree around which the Warli Adivasi Revolt of 1945 began in Talasari taluka’s Zari village. Nearly 5,000 indentured tribals who gathered here from Thane, Vikramgad, Dahanu and Palghar had refused to work on landlords’ fields until they received 12 annas a day in wages, their resistance sowing the first seeds of rights-based movements among the region’s indigenous communities. Today, the younger generation in Zari, 150 km from Mumbai, has no more than a faint acquaintanceship with their ancestors’ historic struggle but a blend of that history and contemporary circumstances keeps Talasari’s adivasis loyal to those who led that revolt, the Communist Party and the All India Kisan Sabha.
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jeudi 5 mars 2020

Delhi: This new show celebrates legendary works by SH Raza and Akbar Padamsee


Source Architectural Digest by Uma Nair
Rare artworks by the masters are not just precious pieces of possession—they are also timeless assets, things that can be cherished for generations to come. Nishad Avari, Specialist, Head of Sale | Associate Vice President, South Asian Modern + Contemporary Art at Christie’s writes in from New York to comment on this epic exhibition at Vadehra Art Gallery: “Two of India’s greatest modern artists, Sayed Haider Raza and Akbar Padamsee always approached their respective practices with deep thought and intense focus, constantly pushing boundaries and innovating their unique visual vocabularies. Till their very last years, both artists continued to paint tirelessly, and are survived by impressive and diverse bodies of work. ”
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mercredi 4 mars 2020

India’s indigenous modernist: Jyoti Bhatt


Source Times of India by Uma Nair
Bhatt’s vast documentation of rural India brought him into the web exploring folk, tribal and rural arts-his stint in photography to document India’s indigenous tribes and arts in its villages brought him close to traditional art, culture and rituals. Traditions in rural rhythms led him into a journey of a lifetime. The imagery drawn from the popular and from tribal and folk juxtaposed with artistic intervention developed over the years became his leitmotif. These symbols of religious, social and cultural importance became a tool to comment on the change and transformation in society. Soft sarcasm and soothing seductive satire aided his narratives. Identity and the hybridisation of the lived everyday idiom became his insignia. At the Bihar Museum in Patna, art lovers regaled over his contours, the expression emanating an enchanting journey of 60 years in printmaking. Happy Birthday Jyoti Bhai.
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mardi 3 mars 2020

In Conversation with Shine Shivan

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